When Do The Rules of Professional Conduct Apply to Social Media Postings?

            In today’s connected society, it’s difficult to escape the necessity of joining the world of social media networking. For attorneys, social media may provide fast, easy, and economical means of reaching clients and potential clients and advertising their services. “Victory in court today! Contact me for a free consultation,” and “Just won a million dollar verdict! Tell your friends to check me out,” are examples of common social media postings utilized by attorneys to spread the word of their success and appeal to clients. But are such postings subject to the Rules of Professional Conduct regarding advertising? This was the issue recently decided by The State Bar of California Standing Committee on Professional Responsibility and Conduct.

            The Rules of Professional Conduct and the Business and Professions Code place numerous requirements and restrictions on attorney advertisements and communications. Rule 1-400 of the Rules of Professional Conduct entitled “Advertising and Solicitation” provides detailed requirements with which attorney advertising must comply. However, despite its title, it speaks in terms of “communications” rather than specifically “advertisements.”  The rule defines a “communication” as “any message or offer made…for professional employment…directed to any former, present, or prospective client.”  Furthermore, the Business and Professions Code defines an advertisement as any “communication…that solicits employment of legal services.” Therefore, when it comes to social media postings, because such postings are technically communications, they must be carefully analyzed to ensure that the rules are complied with. Despite the fact that these rules do not specifically refer to Facebook or Twitter postings, “there is little doubt that the restrictions [of the rules] indeed apply to computer-based communications.” (The State Bar of California Standing Committee on Professional Responsibility and Conduct, Formal Opinion no. 2012-186.) In light of the foregoing, it was determined by the Standing Committee that the real issue when determining whether a Facebook or Twitter posting constitutes a communication within the meaning of the rules is whether the statement “concern[s] the availability of professional employment” of an attorney. (Rule 1-400(A).)

            For example, a Facebook posting stating, “Case finally won! Celebrating tonight,” does not seek employment by the attorney. Whatever the attorney’s subjective intent when making the statement, it does not constitute a communication for purposes of the rules. In contrast, the statement “Victory in court today! My client is delighted. Contact me for a free consultation,” suggests the availability of professional employment and is therefore subject to the rules. This statement furthermore violates Rule 1-400(E), Standard 2 by containing a client testimonial (“[m]y client is delighted!”) without an express disclaimer.

            Any social media posting that seeks professional employment and is therefore subject to the rules must comply with the advertising requirements that apply to such communications. Rule 1-400, Standard 5 requires that the communication bears the word “advertisement” or “newsletter”, or other words to that effect. Additionally, any such communication must be retained by the attorney for two years; this rule has been specifically extended to include “electronic media” by Rule 1-400(F). 

            While the social media outlets may provide personalized, informal contact with friends and business contacts, it should be remembered by all attorneys that the informal arena does not relieve the attorney of his or her ethical obligations. So, before you press “send” on your tweet, don’t forget to check your statements to ensure they are in compliance with the Rules of Professional Conduct.

Jampol Zimet LLP

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One Response to When Do The Rules of Professional Conduct Apply to Social Media Postings?

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